Skip to main
University-wide Navigation

UK CTAC will use assessment strategies and the Project ECHO framework to deliver targeted technical assistance to organizations to support workforce resiliency (those with positive COVID-19 cases, those working with the highest risk organizations). Project ECHO is a collaborative model of education and care management approach that empowers professionals to use evidence and expert mentoring, in this case, to assist organizational leaders in improving the wellness and resiliency of their staff. The ECHO model uses a telementoring model of learning and skill acquisition to improve access to the specialty-focused expertise needed to address difficult and complex conditions.

This program is being supported by a SAMHSA grant through the Kentucky Department for Behavioral Health, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities to the University of Kentucky Center on Trauma and Children. 

 

This program is free to attend.

 

Project ECHO: Health and Wellness in Uncertain Times, Strategies for Being Well@Work meets over Zoom.

January 23 noon to 1 pm (ET): Widening the Window of Tolerance to Manage Workplace Stress 

January 30 noon to 1 pm (ET): Cognitive Flexibility to Enhance Coping 

February 6 noon to 1 pm (ET): The Power of Peer Relationships to Build Resilience 

February 13 noon to 1 pm (ET): Creating Compassionate Workplaces

February 20 noon to 1 pm (ET): Moving from Struggle to Strength



What participants will experience:


Project ECHO is a collaborative model of education and care management that empowers professionals to use evidence and expert mentoring, in this case, to assist professionals in improving the wellness and resiliency. The ECHO model uses a telementoring model of learning and skill acquisition to improve access to the specialty-focused expertise needed to address difficult and complex conditions. The ECHO Health and Wellness in Uncertain Times offers participants the opportunity to gain skills to address the stress and distress associated with the work they do through peer discussion, mentorship, and practical examples to enable them to implement strategies to stay Well@Work.


Who should register:


Healthcare workers, behavioral health professionals, teachers, FRYSCs, school mental health professionals, school personnel, social services workers, librarians, or anyone seeking support to build workforce resiliency.



CEUs available.

EILA, FRYSC, Social Work, Psychology. LPCC application pending.

ECHO Faculty

Ginny Sprang, Ph.D.

Ginny Sprang, Ph.D., is a professor in the College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry at the University of Kentucky, and executive director of the UK Center on Trauma and Children. She is the Principal Investigator of the SAMHSA funded Category II Secondary Traumatic Stress Innovations and Solutions Center, the Category III Child and Adolescent Trauma Treatment and Training Institute, and Chair Emeritus of the Secondary Traumatic Stress Collaborative group. She has or currently holds national leadership positions in the National Child Traumatic Stress Network as a steering committee member and the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies Special Interest Group Chair for the Terrorism and Disaster committee. Dr. Sprang has over 125 publications on topics such as child trauma, trauma informed care, the commercial sexual exploitation of minors, implementation and sustainability, disaster response and secondary traumatic stress.  Her work involves the creation of translational tools, and the development, testing and implementation of evidence-based treatments and practices to treat those exposed to these traumatic experiences. 

Jessica Eslinger, Ph.D.

Jessica Eslinger, Ph.D., LCSW is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and a clinician, trainer, and researcher at the Center on Trauma and Children. Dr. Eslinger has over 25 years of clinical experience working with children and their families affected by trauma in community mental health, inpatient, and private practice settings. Her work includes direct clinical services, training, and a broad scope of research related activities, including the development and monitoring of research protocols and the coordination and supervision of data collection. Dr. Eslinger’s scholarly work has focused on examining factors that influence evidence-based mental health treatment outcomes, treatment attrition, and secondary traumatic stress.

Stephanie Gusler, Ph.D.

Stephanie Gusler, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at the University of Kentucky Center on Trauma and Children. She completed her predoctoral internship at the Medical University of South Carolina where she implemented evidence-based interventions for trauma, including Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) and Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT). She received her Doctorate in Clinical Child Psychology from the University of Kansas in 2021. Dr. Gusler’s work includes providing trauma-informed interventions and training as well as supporting ongoing research such as that of the Secondary Traumatic Stress Innovations and Solutions Center (STS-ISC). Her academic work has focused on examining the effects of trauma on families, including psychopathology, difficulties with emotion regulation, and risk for intergenerational trauma.

Ruth Gottfried, Ph.D.

RUTH GOTTFRIED, Ph.D., is a faculty member at the David Yellin Academic College of Education, where she serves as head of the Dance Movement Therapy Master’s Degree Program. She is likewise an external lecturer and Ph.D. advisor at the School of Social Work and Social Welfare at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Alongside her work in Israel, Ruth serves as a consultant for the Secondary Traumatic Stress Innovations and Solutions Center (STS-ISC), at the University of Kentucky’s Center on Trauma and Children (CTAC). Following her M.A. and Ph.D. studies at the School of Creative Arts Therapies at the University of Haifa, Ruth completed two post-doctoral fellowships at Tel Aviv and Georgia State Universities, where she focused on the topic of secondary traumatic stress (STS). Moreover, Ruth is a graduate of the Applied Compassion Training (ACT), a flagship program of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education (CCARE) at Stanford University. At present, Ruth is studying for a second Ph.D., at the Department of East Asian Studies at Tel Aviv University, where she is focusing on compassion and STS from a Buddhist perspective. Ruth has published in the highly ranked Oxford University Press and Harvard Educational Review, and is a frequent presenter at national (Israel) and international conferences focusing primarily on trauma, secondary traumatic stress and compassion.

Alex Clark, MDiv, LMFT

Alex Clark, MA, MDiv, LMFT is the Project Coordinator for the SAMHSA funded Secondary Traumatic Stress Innovations and Solutions Center (STS-ISC), a category II site of the National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN) (Sprang, PI).  In this role, he supports the goals and objectives of the STS-ISC grant related to developing, implementing and testing interventions to address secondary trauma to a variety of organizations, supervisors, resource parents, and other professionals nationwide.  Alex is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist with clinical experience working with trauma, early childhood, adolescents, adults, couples, and families across various settings including psychiatric residential treatment facilities, outpatient community mental health centers, children’s advocacy centers, and private practice settings.  Alex earned his Master of Arts in Marriage and Family Therapy and Masters of Divinity from Asbury Theological Seminary.  

Contact the Well@Work Coordinator

Request more information on upcoming Project ECHOs.

Email Emily Smith

Register for Project ECHO: Health and Wellness in Uncertain Times, Strategies for Being Well@Work

Click here to register!