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Kentucky mental health professionals dealing with case overload after multiple disasters

Click here to listen to the story on WKMS. Corina Hall remembers looking out her window and watching her car be submerged by water shortly before 4 a.m. on March 1, 2021. Minutes later, water soaked her feet in her bathroom. Hall said that shocked her. She didn’t expect the water to keep rising, and she didn’t know what to do. “I’m sitting there trying to dip it out with a mop bucket,” Hall said.

Conversations for Action: College Access and Success

Dreama Gentry, Executive Director, was joined by Dr. Ginny Sprang, a professor in the College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry at the University of Kentucky, and executive director of the UK Center on Trauma and Children and Dr. Vestena Robbins who is the Senior Executive Advisor for the Kentucky Department for Behavioral Health, Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services. This conversation focused on how trauma can be a barrier to college success and best practices for addressing trauma and secondary trauma in rural areas.

WEKU-NPR Interviews Dr. Ginny Sprang on pandemic conditions and childhood abuse and neglect

It's hard enough to be a kid in a pandemic, but what if life was already a nightmare and now nobody's paying attention?  In this WEKU interview, UK Center on Trauma and Children's Executive director, Dr. Ginny Sprang, discusses on how pandemic conditions may be veiling increasing abuse and neglect.  Click here to listen to the interview from Eastern Standard on WEKU.

WEKU-NPR Interviews Dr. Ginny Sprang on moral distress, secondary traumatic stress, and compassion satisfaction during the Covid-19 Pandemic

UK psychiatrist Ginny Sprang on moral and ethical dilemmas found on the frontlines of covid-19. Click here to listen to the interview on Eastern Standard on WEKU.

NCTSN Deputy Director’s Download features Dr. Ginny Sprang

In this episode, we hear from Ginny Sprang, the Executive Director of the Center on Trauma and Children and Professor in the College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry at the University of Kentucky. Since joining the Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) Collaborative Group in 2008, as a co-chair, she has helped lead efforts to raise awareness about secondary traumatic stress, including how it can impact the quality of care that an organization provides.

Researchers Awarded Grant to Study Secondary Traumatic Stress in Health Workers

Read the story on UK Research News here.  LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 21, 2020) – Researchers in the University of Kentucky Center on Trauma and Children were awarded a $3 million grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) to establish a national Secondary Traumatic Stress Innovations and Solutions Center (STS-ISC) to develop and test interventions to treat secondary traumatic stress.

Megan Kohler’s interview with Dr. Greg Davis on Addressing the Unique Needs of Children Facing Trauma on WUKY

Listen to the full story here. You’ve heard us cover the topic of trauma recently on Dr. Greg Davis on Medicine.  This week we’re highlighting a more specialized patient cohort and their unique needs and challenges.  Dr. Greg recently took a tour of the Center on Trauma and Children in the UK College of Medicine with clinical social worker and clinician Megan Kohler.  

Familial Sex Trafficking: Victims Hiding in Plain Sight

Click here to read the blog!   09 Jan Familial Sex Trafficking: Victims Hiding in Plain Sight Posted at 10:45h in In The Community, Policy by Mara Powell

ISTSS Research Spotlight: Ginny Sprang, Ph.D.

Click here to listen to the interview!  Prof Ginny Sprang from the Center on Trauma and Children at the University of Kentucky speaks to Monique Pfaltz about her work on Secondary Traumatic Stress.

Tips for Managing Distress in Children Following Traumatic Events

Read the story here.  By Ginny Sprang, Ph.D LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 5, 2019) — Whether it is the local evening news or a 24-hour cable news channel, images of violence inundates our homes. These scenes can be disturbing and stressful, especially for children. It is important to manage distress and take appropriate steps in helping your children and adolescents following traumatic events.